News

The rise of soil degradation in Britain and Worldwide

Woman holding a handful of rich fertile soil

Woman holding a handful of rich fertile soil

The rise of soil degradation in Britain and Worldwide

 

30 football fields per minute are equivalent to how much soil we are losing.

 

Soil degradation is becoming a large problem within Britain, especially in East Anglia, as well as worldwide. There has been a report by the Parliament Office of Science and Technology, identifying high financial expenses costing up to £1.4 billion a year. There is more soil being lost than there is being refilled through natural processes. The reason for this devastating soil degradation is due to high pollution in the air, erosion, high levels of acidity and nutrient reduction.

 

There are two key issues that have impacted the soil degradation. These include the overload (also known as compaction) of liver stock and heavy agricultural machinery, and the loss of organic soil, which means it is blocking the growth of fertility from occurring. This compaction makes it difficult for rainwater to reach the soil, and slips off land very easily. This has resulted in excess flooding, which has cost £233 million a year from the Government. Maize fields and wheat yields have been prone to low oil fertility.

 

However the question is where does all this soil go if it is ‘lost’? Devastatingly, the soil and nutrients end up in rivers and other water forms. This is a serious matter, since sea creates are affected, causing many health problems.

 

There are many ways in which soil degradation can be improved, by maintaining a more effective sustainable land. A few improvements include rotating crops at a slower pace to grow green manures, adding organic fertilisers and planting many trees close to soil, which will help act as a long-term benefit.