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Japan Government Helps Build Soil Conservation After Nepal Earthquake

Japan Government Helps Build Soil Conservation After Nepal Earthquake

Japan Government Helps Build Soil Conservation After Nepal Earthquake

The government of Japan has recently given over 500 tones of wire worth Rupees 70.35 million to the Ministry of Forests and Soil Conservation after the Nepal earthquake in April 2015. The earthquake was situated in Kathmandu, with a population of nearly 2.5 million people. The earthquake had weakened the land’s surfaces, which resulted in greater soil erosion and slippery landslides in many affected areas. It had collapsed a number of buildings, houses and temples. Many witnesses said that the trembling and swaying of the earth went on for several minutes, and the earthquake’s hypocenter was 11 kilometers. The strong aftershocks of the earthquake had made the soil go softer and weaker, where some areas were more damaged than others. This was caused by soil amplification, irregularities in elevation and plan, lack of detailing and construction materials, and inadequate resistance to horizontal ground shaking.

 

These wires offered by the Japan earthquake will help converse soil, and will provide soil stabilisation and balance any slippery landslides and soil erosion. The Government of Japan has been facilitating and supporting Nepal since 2010, by providing full protection on soil and watershed management. Straight after the earthquake, the Government had immediately sent out a separate team of 70 National Police Agency rescuers, The Disaster Management Agency, and Japan Coast Guard to provide support and assistance.

 

The Forest Conservation program will help cover 56 districts that were affected, 14 of which were extremely damaged. This will reduce the risk of soil erosion and slippery landslides to occur again in the long-term. Although the local communities and direct authorities have been demanding the Government for gabion wires instead of ordinary wires, the ministry is still yet to meet these demands. The local communities argued that gabion wire would be more durable and stronger for protecting the soil in the long-term.