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Bunbury’s Sporting Fields Shut After Shattered Glass Exposed on Topsoil

Bunbury’s Sporting Fields Shut After Shattered Glass Exposed on Topsoil.

Bunbury's Sporting Fields Shut After Shattered Glass Exposed on Topsoil

 

Bunbury’s Sporting Fields Shut After Shattered Glass Exposed on Topsoil.

 

In Bunbury city, West Australia, three sporting grounds has been exposed with shattered glass on composting topsoil. Many concerned residents noticed the damage that was conducted on junior cricket grounds, hockey grounds and football grounds, which soon spread around on social media. The shattered glass was invisible when the topsoil was first laid out onto the fields. However the glass became visible after the compost was watered down. A good team of 20 workers went out to the grounds, ensuring that they all wore fully protected gear, and picked up as much shattered glass as possible. 

The acting director of works in Bunbury, Greg Golinski stated that the problem was solved through the purchase of 700 cubic metres of compost from the regional council, which came to a total cost of £8,415. A good team of external contractors were used to apply the topsoil on the sporting grounds. Much of the process is going to be very manual based and a lot of intense labour will be implemented according to Mr Golinski. However, decisions on who should be responsible for the costly process is still under discussion.

 

Mr Golinski had stated that the topsoil still needed to be checked for quality in the future, since it is the first time a different soil is being used on the sporting grounds. This type of topsoil tends to be used in the form of agricultural and broader farming and has never been used on sporting grounds. This soil will continue to be used for this purpose, however a screening process is still needed to be conducted before the soil is laid. This is why a quality check is still required in the near future, to see whether or not the sporting grounds are performing just as well as the previous compost.