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How to Make a Compost Heap for Your Garden

Composting the Kitchen Waste

Composting the Kitchen Waste

How to Make a Compost Heap for Your Garden

Now is the perfect time of year to get your compost heap started, ready for laying on your garden in the Spring time to help with your planting and growth. Whether you are looking to improve your current compost heap, or whether you want to create a new one, we have the tips and advice to help you make the perfect compost heap.

 

If you don’t fancy building an open compost heap in your garden, then try a compost bin. They are compact, so they are a great option for smaller gardens. When choosing the right spot for your compost heap or bin, you need to look for a level, well drained spot. This ensures that any excess water drains away easily. This also helps worms get in and start breaking down the content.

 

Put Good Stuff in to get Good Stuff Out

It is important to make sure that you put the right organic matter into your compost. These can be vegetable peelings, fruit waste, teabags, plant pruning and grass cuttings. It is also good to include things such as cardboard egg boxes, scrunched up paper and fallen leaves. These are slower to rot but provide vital fibre and carbon and also allow important air pockets to form in the mixture. Crushed eggshells can also be included as they provide useful mineral.

 

There are a few things you should never place in your bin. No meat or dairy products (unless you have opted for a digester). No diseased plants, and definitely no animal excrement, or babies’ nappies. Putting any of these things in your compost will lead to unwanted pests and smalls.

 

When your compost is ready, you will have a dark brown, almost black soil-like layer at the bottom of your bin. It should have a spongy texture and will be rich in nutrients. Compost takes around six months to mature, but the longer you leave it the more it will do for your garden. Spreading compost on your flower beds will great improve their soil quality by helping it retain moisture and suppress weeds. It also reduces the need to use chemical fertilisers and pesticides.